What is Assisted Living?

Assisted living is a housing arrangement for seniors who need some supervision and help with activities of daily living such as meal preparation, housekeeping and bathing, but who don't need skilled nursing care. At most assisted living communities, you can expect to see private or semiprivate rooms within a complex along with meals, shared dining, kitchenettes, common spaces for socializing, organized activities, transportation services, Alzheimer's care, and more.

Assisted Living Care, Nursing home Jobs and Amenities

Today's assisted living communities offer a wide variety of amenities and services to their residents. Oftentimes less expensive than skilled nursing facilities or in-home care, most assisted living communities have a full, round-the-clock staff trained to assist residents with a variety of daily activities, from eating, bathing and dressing to medication management, toileting and help with incontinence. Many assisted living communities also provide specialized care for residents with dementia.

Assisted living goes by different names in different states, and licensing requirements will vary. Here in our assisted living directory, you'll find assisted living providers, personal care homes, board and care homes, and alzheimer's care facilities.

Most communities also provide housekeeping, three daily meals plus snacks, scheduled exercise, health and transportation programs, and a host of organized health activities and events. Many communities feature on-site amenities like gyms, swimming pools, common areas for socializing, beauty salons, pharmacies, libraries, pets and more.

Paying For Assisted Living

Assisted living can be pricey, but in many cases, it's more affordable than in-home care or nursing home care in the same geographic area. There are many ways to pay for assisted living, which isn't covered by Medicare, except in the case of long-term rehabilitation. Long-term care insurance, veteran's benefits, life insurance, annuities, a bridge loan, or simply pooling family resources are all common ways to cover the costs of assisted living.

Senior Living: Assisted Living and Other Options

Not all senior living communities offer assistance for their residents, so it's important to familiarize yourself with the different types of communities and the types of services they provide. Assisted living communities are designed for residents that need some assistance with daily activities but do not need skilled nursing care. In addition to assisted living, there are:

Independent living communities, commonly known as retirement communities, are where seniors who don't require care live within a community of fellow seniors. Homes in these communities are typically smaller and easier to manage.

Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs), provide a full range of housing choices and services on one campus-- from independent living to assisted living to skilled nursing. This option is best for those who want to be able to stay in one place as they age.

Board and care facilities are designed for seniors who can't live independently due to mental or physical disabilities but who don't require fulltime skilled nursing care.

Skilled nursing facilities, also called nursing homes, are best for those with physical or mental health conditions requiring fulltime monitoring and medical care. Nursing homes that also offer rehabilitation services for those who need short-term, fulltime care are also considered "rehabilitation facilities." Most skilled nursing residents live in semi-private rooms, and meals are usually provided.

Oftentimes less expensive than skilled nursing facilities or in-home care, most assisted living communities have a full, round-the-clock staff trained to assist residents with a variety of daily activities, from eating, bathing and dressing to medication management, toileting and help with incontinence. Many assisted living communities also provide specialized care for residents with dementia.

Assisted living can be pricey, but in many cases, it's more affordable than in-home care or nursing home care in the same geographic area. Long-term care insurance, veteran's benefits, life insurance, annuities, a bridge loan, or simply pooling family resources are all common ways to cover the costs of assisted living.

Assisted living communities are designed for residents that need some assistance with daily activities but do not need skilled nursing care.

 

Journal on mental health, dementia, (including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, depression etc.), and memory problems.

Site updated 20th July 2004

 

 

 

Signpost Journal produced by Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust in association with Dementia Services Development Centre Wales. Tel. 029 2033 6073. Fax. 029 2033 6385 E-mail; Signpost